My Article Got Published in a Magazine!

My Article Got Published in a Magazine!

About a month ago, I entered a competition to have my work published in a Warwick University Law Magazine: Obiter Dicta, in their lifestyle section: ‘Chill Zone’. It has now been published in the Winter Edition and I will have more opportunities to publish my work. I am pretty excited! Here is my work 🙂

University Realities – What you weren’t told about before coming to Warwick

University life isn’t always what we expect it to be, and some things can only be learned by experiencing them first-hand. Here a few Warwick uni experiences to be warned about for unsuspecting freshers and tips to help you make the most of your time in the Bubble.

‘Adult-ing isn’t easy’

One of my favourite quotes is that being at ‘University is like losing your Mum in a supermarket for three years’- and this is so true. It’s undeniable that University is one of the biggest learning curves. Before I started at Warwick, I knew nothing about bills, washing machines or even how expensive it is to buy fruit. But it’s certainly a giggle figuring these things out- once you’ve put a red sock in the white wash, you probably won’t do it again. But hey, pink is the new white. Likewise, with the buses you only put a ten pound note into the money-sucker once before realising they don’t give change.

‘Who took my milk?’

I sometimes wonder what it would be like to set up hidden cameras in University kitchens, I really do think it would be like Big Brother. Living with a group of people, from a range of backgrounds, with a variety of personalities, can be unbelievably fun, but equally challenging. Being a student is very much like being a detective- who took my milk? Who left the kitchen unlocked? Who’s that sleeping on our kitchen table?

‘I like going home and picking up a tea towel, knowing I won’t catch a disease’

One of my top tips to any Fresher is to befriend the cleaner. Nagging your flat to keep the kitchen tidy, in fear of a fine, is the bane of any Fresher’s life. Last year I had a friend over to visit, had just cooked a typical University meal (probably potato waffles) and was starting the washing up. After a few weeks at University you adapt to the environment, for example you never lean on a kitchen surface, unless you, personally, have cleaned it. Less than 5 minutes prior. My friend, with good intentions of course, picked up a random tea towel from the side and started drying my plates. I don’t like to think what was being smeared over my undeserving tableware. Another University hack is never to venture out your room without some form of shoe or slipper- it’s not worth the risk.

‘Student Union + Sticky Floors = Trainers’

In my first year I went shopping for the perfect Freshers outfits and the best shoes. By term two, I was wearing trainers to go clubbing. The Copper Rooms are perfect for singing to cheesy music, being dragged into mosh pits, making friends in toilets and ultimately getting your footwear covered in some sort of sticky substance that eternally swamps the floor. In a way, it’s a beautiful thing- no need to worry about blisters from 5 inch heels, people jumping on your feet is blooming irritating, but not excruciating, plus there is no need to take your shoes off on the walk home.

‘University Food Favourites’

Cooking for one is pretty limiting and, having come to University with several Cook Books I hoped to use, it is quite easy to fall into eating unhealthy and convenient foods. During my first year, I found a few ways to make maintaining a healthy lifestyle easier. One thing that surprised me was the expense of fruit and vegetables, which is an immediate deterrent to eating healthier- but persevere, there are ways around this!

Firstly, I found that cooking a decent meal for one is difficult and time consuming when you have deadlines and general university pressures. I found that making food in bulk is a good idea, which means you need loads of Tupperware. Examples of foods to make in bulk include; spaghetti, chilli con carne and breakfast muffins. Breakfast muffins are a particular favourite of mine, once they have all cooled out of the oven, put them into plastic bags individually and put them in the freezer. Then, when you are rushing to get out the door, put one in the microwave for a minute and eat it on the go. Top tip- careful, berries can explode if they’re microwaved for too long!

Secondly, after a long day, I just want to eat. I’m not fussed with faffing around. So I love the weight watchers meals, they take a maximum of 8 minutes in the microwave and are truly delicious. There are lots of variations such as; Thai green curry, sweet and sour with rice, risotto, carbonara, tikka masala and salmon with potato wedges.

I have never been a breakfast-lover, and at University, there is so much temptation to skip the meal, but it really isn’t worth the embarrassment of a tummy rumble in a lecture theatre. So, I make sure I buy the pots of fruit from the Supermarket, often there is an offer and they are so convenient to make porridge or Weetabix that bit more exciting. Likewise, I had never tried avocado either. Now, I would have half an avocado on toast for breakfast every day if I could. I even have them as a snack (they’re even better with Nandos piri-piri salt on top). It is just about what is best for you and your diet.

Finally, I absolutely love the phone app Life Sum: I never particularly liked calorie counting but nothing was working and it is hard to keep up a diet when you’re at University and on a budget. With this, I try to avoid lactose and gluten, which makes the diets even more difficult to follow. So LifeSum really does make me feel more in control of my diet, and is really flexible with the foods I can and can’t eat- I eat what suits me, unlike strict diets that give you recipes for each day. I don’t feel like I am constantly thinking about what I am eating, but I feel like I have a plan that is sustainable.

Lifesum Review

Lifesum Review


I have found that staying healthy at University is not an easy task, with take outs on every corner, alcohol being pretty central to nights out and even with the amount of physical activity my History Degree demands. Having to avoid dairy, gluten and the majority of fruit has made this task even more difficult, but I have recently found an App that really does work for me- Lifesum.

I am by no means a large person, but have not felt brilliant about the way I look for quite a while and have tried several methods of losing weight… that really haven’t been successful. Even when I have been avoiding both dairy and gluten my figure hasn’t changed and I haven’t noticed a different in the way I feel.

I decided to download the Lifesum App onto my phone and can honestly say it’s really really good!

  • What should I eat? I am not educated on what is good and bad. I thought I was, but the app has shown me that that might have been where I was going wrong. You simply enter manually or scan the barcode of whatever you have eaten and it tracks your daily intake of carbs, protein and fat, showing you how much of it you can have.
  • Footfall: The app links to any exercise app already on your phone that records your foot fall, automatically adding it onto how many calories you have for the rest of the day.
  • What do you want to achieve? When you activate the app, it asks you to enter height, weight and what you would like to achieve, either: lose weight, get healthier or put on weight. It then asks your desired weight and spreads the ‘diet’ over 22 weeks, each week is therefore different.
  • Recipes in line with your health goals: The app offers healthy recipes for every time of the day, whether that is breakfast, lunch, dinner or even snacks.
  • Water: It tells you how many cups of water you should drinking a day, and even reminds you if you haven’t drunk for a while, or when it is best for you to drink in terms of losing weight.
  • Statistics: the app records every day on a calendar and suggests that you weigh yourself once a week, to really see the difference.

It really does make me feel more in control of my diet, and is really flexible with the foods I can and can’t eat- I eat what suites me, unlike strict diets that give you recipes for each day. I don’t feel like I am constantly thinking about what I am eating, but I feel like I have a plan that is sustainable.

I really do recommend this to anyone who wants to notice a different in a week.

Hope you enjoyed the Blog- like and subscribe for more!

Bee xoxo

Allergy and Dairy Free Me

Allergy and Dairy Free Me

I have recently come to notice that most of my blogs revolve around the food I eat and the drinks I consume, so I am going to dedicate this blog to discussing my diet!

  1. When I was about 7, I had my first anaphylactic shock to artificial food colourings, in particular: green, yellow and orange. I think this was primarily down to greed. Mum always rationed the amount of sweets I was allowed and so given the opportunity to stuff my face- I did! Hence birthday parties being a tad hazardous. Long story short and several anaphylactic shocks later, I have learnt to avoid everything artificial, including: bacon frazzles, icing, starburst, cherryade, sprinkles and many more.
  2. Peaches. My ultimate nemesis. Having been able to control my anaphylaxis I avoided having any trips to A&E for about a year. But I one day at work I had a peach and within seconds I looked like I had Botox and was struggling to breath. Turns out, though similar in symptoms, I have oral mouth syndrome, which is an allergy to certain fruit families so to speak.
  3. In 2010 I was told I had IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) having had excruciating stomach cramps and was hospitalised with suspected appendicitis. Changing my diet to suit this included avoiding wheat entirely. Though a drastic change, it did help, to start with. I have to say avoiding wheat can be really hard, though in terms of health- it’s pretty good for you. Despite avoiding wheat, I still had stomach cramps.
  4. So University was an opportunity for me to really monitor my diet. My sister had been told she had an intolerance to dairy, and I thought I’d give it a go at avoiding that. This was a total success and I haven’t gone back. It’s actually unbelievable how many alternatives to dairy products there are. There is probably a substitute for everything. I honestly cannot taste the difference between dairy and non-dairy. I often use one of the following: Lacto-Free milk, soya milk, almond milk, coconut milk, oat milk or goats milk as alternatives to cows milk.

It’s a much healthier lifestyle and so easy to adapt to. You honestly don’t miss out on anything.